2015 Presentations & Handouts

To access handouts for the sessions, click on the title of the session. If there are multiple handouts, they will be listed under the abstract. If there is not a handout available, it means the presenter has not provided the handout to be posted online. "No Handout" has been indicated for presentations where the presenter has notified us that there will not be a handout to post online.

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

8:00 – 11:30 AM

CAH Pre-Conference

Pre-Conference Agenda

8:30 – 11:30 AM

NDPHA Meeting

  • No handouts

12:45 – 1:45 PM

Keynote 1: ACOs: Adapting to Healthcare Reform
Lynn Barr, MA, Founder, National Rural ACO Consortium

ABSTRACT: Adopting the ACO framework is the first step toward sustainability, as it provides a tremendous amount of actionable data, and lays the groundwork for strategic, narrow referral networks and community-based insurance plans. The National Rural ACO Consortium, has enabled rural providers to qualify for the Medicare Shared Savings Program and play an active part in Healthcare Reform.

2:00 – 3:00 PM

Intensive 1A:

Oral Health Access, Utilization, and Status in North Dakota
Shawnda Schroeder, PhD, Research Specialist, Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: The North Dakota Center for Rural Health completed an assessment of oral health access, utilization, and status in the state. This presentation will highlight findings of the study while also discussing the engagement model developed to involve stakeholders in the identification of need and health policy implications. The model may be replicated to engage a variety of different provider groups.


Potential Strategies for Pediatric Care in a Rural Health Setting
Monika Moni, MD, PGY3, Chief Resident, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Minot
Kimberly Krohn, MD, Director, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Minot

ABSTRACT: Two physicians will discuss the essential elements of a pediatric health program on a rural Indian reservation and a public health approach to pediatric asthma care.


Session 1: Care Coordination: Improving Healthcare Quality in Your Community
Becky Wahl, Northland Care Coordination Project Director
Tim Cox, MBA, FACHE, President, Northland Healthcare Alliance

ABSTRACT: The goals of Northland Care Coordination (NCC) are focused on the triple aim which is to improve the health of our population and to improve the healthcare communication resulting in overall lower healthcare costs. The population served is those with chronic illness that need assistance coordinating their care. NCC will provide transitional care coordination, coordination of care management with the goal of self-management for those enrolled in the program. NCC works with a team of healthcare providers to ensure the enrollee has the proper education and understands the education provided. In this process to reach the self-management goal, NCC works to advocate and facilitate the communication between providers and other healthcare professionals. The intent of the program to have those enrolled become engaged and empowered in their own health.


Session 2: Ebola Panel Discussion
Michelle Feist, BA, Epidemiology and Surveillance Program Manager, North Dakota Department of Health
Julie Sickler, BS, Public Health Preparedness Division Director, North Dakota Department of Health

ABSTRACT: This discussion will focus on Ebola surveillance, preparedness, and prevention activities at the North Dakota Department of Health. Topics will include disease overview and outbreak details, surveillance activities and processes, disease prevention and educational efforts, partner coordination, preparedness and response activates, and other activities that have occurred across the state. Challenges encountered throughout the planning and operational processes will also be discussed.


Session 3: Who Can Do What in Public Health: State, Tribal, Local, and Private Legal Authority
Brittney Bauerly, JD, Staff Attorney, Network for Public Health Law

ABSTRACT: This session describes legal authority and duties related to public health services at the state, tribal, and local level. Areas examined include communicable disease, chronic disease, maternal and child health, environmental health, and emergency services. Opportunities to discuss collaboration strategies, relation to the accreditation process, and how to work with legal counsel will be provided.

3:15 – 4:15 PM

Intensive 1B:

Physician Assistant Workforce: Growing Our Own North Dakota Professionals
Jeanie McHugo, PhD, PA-C, Department Chair, Physician Assistant Studies, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences
Jay Metzger, MPAS, PA-C, Assistant Professor, Physician Assistant Studies, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences
Heidi Olson-Fitzgerald, PA-C, Community Faculty, Physician Assistant Studies, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: The role of a Physician Assistant (PA) is well equipped to assist in improving the access to healthcare in rural areas. An understanding of the current PA workforce within the state allows for increased awareness of the role and how working together to “grow our own” will positively impact all involved. This presentation will focus on the educational and clinical solutions to the challenges of delivering healthcare.


Rural Surgery Support -- How Academic Surgeons Can Fill the Gap
Mary Aaland, MD, Director of Rural Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: Providing surgical care in rural communities is not only a challenge for the surgeon but also for the smaller hospitals. The Department of Surgery at the University of North Dakota has developed an innovative surgical program which utilizes academic surgeons who commit to smaller communities to provide consistent surgical backup. The presentation will summarize the program and what it has achieved in its first year.


Session 4: "What Happened to You?" Creating a Caring and Inclusive Trauma-Informed Environment
Suzanne Kramer-Brenna, MA, Outreach Specialist, CAWS North Dakota
Lynne Tally, LSW, CDVA, Executive Director, Safe Shelter

ABSTRACT: Rural domestic violence and sexual assault victim/survivors experience multiple forms of abuse and oppression in their lives, and this violence can increase their risk for trauma-related mental health and substance abuse issues. This session will provide an integrated framework for participants on the context of violence-related trauma and ways to create a trauma-informed agency environment.


Session 5: Quality and Performance Improvement
Patrick Schultz, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, CCRN, Director of Clinical Performance Improvement, Sanford Medical Center

ABSTRACT: There is heightened focus on healthcare quality throughout the United States. This focus is causing pressure for providers and healthcare systems to improve performance. This session will present the pressures to achieve quality, methods for improving quality, and examples of quality work in rural and public health settings.


Session 6: Advance Care Planning in North Dakota: The Past – The Present – The Future
Sally May, BA, Senior Quality Improvement Specialist, Quality Health Associates of North Dakota

ABSTRACT: This program will introduce participants to the status of advance care planning in North Dakota, the evolution of the North Dakota Advance Care Planning initiative, and the value of partnerships in developing and implementing a comprehensive advance care planning program in North Dakota.


Wednesday, June 3, 2015

8:00 – 9:00 AM

Keynote 2: Opportunities and Challenges of Rural Healthcare and ACA Implementation
Kim Gillian, MA, Regional Director, Region VIII, United States Department of Health and Human Services

ABSTRACT: The Affordable Care Act, now 5 years since passage, has had a significant impact on reducing the number of uninsured in both urban and rural areas. However, outreach, education and enrollment in rural areas, such as Region 8, pose unique challenges. The talk will discuss both the opportunities and challenges with ACA enrollment, the various roles which were assumed by providers, social service organizations and other rural groups along with an update of the best practices employed in the Dakotas. Additional discussion will cover the challenges of rural healthcare delivery in light of changes in the marketplace, with emphasis on some of the innovative programs underway, the impact of Medicaid expansion and other policy developments.


9:15 – 10:15 AM

Intensive 2: Impact of the Oil Boom on Health Services: State of the Community
Dan Kelly, CEO, McKenzie County Health System
Jeffrey Sather, MD, Medical Director, Emergency Trauma Center, Trinity Health
Sherry Adams, BA, REHS/RS, CHS-V, CDP-I, Executive Officer/Registered Environmental Health Specialist

ABSTRACT: The oil boom in western North Dakota has had a huge impact on healthcare services and services in general in the area. The first part of this intensive will focus on what is currently being felt by the impacted communities. The second part will include panelists discussing possible and already successful solutions for dealing with the effects that the oil boom has had on the communities.


Session 7: Poster Presentations

Ebola: Know the Facts
Sarah Anderson, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University
Siera Zimmerman, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: As healthcare professionals, it is our duty to calm fears and expand public knowledge regarding the transmission, treatment, and prevention of the current Zaire Ebola virus outbreak. Being educated and sharing that information with patients will prevent panic that may be instigated by the media.


Differential Progression of Metabolic Syndrome by Gender: The China Metabolic Syndrome Study
Xiaoxue Gu, MA, Department of Statistics, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: This poster reports on a longitudinal study examining the progression of MetS in Chinese men and women. MetS is a significant predictor of many metabolic diseases. This study showed that MetS rate plateaus for men in their 40s, whereas for women it increases prior to and beyond menopause. A better understanding of MetS, including gender-specific presentation, will help to improve public health.

  • No Handout

Enhancing the Health of Populations Through the Partnership of Public Health and Medicine
Maggie Fresonke, BS, MS Candidate, Public Health, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Public health and primary care are two disciplines committed to improving the health of populations, but are practiced differently. Public health works by organizing accessible and equitable preventative services on a community level, and primary care offers advanced and high quality treatments for disease and illness on an individual level. Through closer collaboration between public health and primary care, we could improve the care being delivered and improve efficiency in the treatment of disease and illness. Strong collaboration between public health and primary care can improve the health of people in North Dakota and around the United States.

  • No Handout

Disparities in Health Service Utilization and Clinical Outcomes Between Type-2 Diabetes Patients With and Without Comorbid Depression
Robert Willborn, BS, MPH Candidate, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: The shortage of mental health services in rural areas is an obstacle for the care of depression in the chronic disease epidemic. Mental health of type-2 diabetes patients should be managed well at the primary care level to optimize outcomes and avoid disease manifestations. This poster will explain differences in service use and health outcomes between type-2 diabetics with and without depression.

  • No Handout

CassClay Alive! Grassroots Movement to Create a Culture of Healthy Living
Stefanie Meyer, MS, Program Coordinator/Lecturer, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Join the Movement is a grassroots initiative that began with a mission to transform the community to reduce overweight and obesity in 2-19 year olds by 20% by 2020. By gathering community members who wanted to be advocates for active living and healthy eating, Join the Movement is a model for other communities to create healthy places that will create healthy people.

  • No Handout

Session 8: Building a Vision for Health: Community Ownership and Engagement
Tiffany Knauf, MA, Project Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences
Brad Gibbens, MPA, Deputy Director, Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: Community engagement can be a tangible, beneficial process where groups and organizations begin to develop trusting relationships to make a difference in their community. This presentation will discuss the importance of community ownership, as well as methods and techniques to achieve a sustainable outcome.


Session 9:

Part A: Community Consortiums as a Strategy for Increasing Physical Activity and Improving Nutrition in Rural Communities
Sharon Buhr, MPH, Director, Young People’s Healthy Heart Program, Mercy Hospital
Joyce Sayler, RN, Program Coordinator, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, North Dakota Department of Health
Jennifer Uhrich, MPA, Executive Director, Well Being Development

ABSTRACT: This presentation describes factors contributing to the success of a community consortium, Barnes County On The Move, which increased the level of physical activity and improved nutrition in its rural community. The On The Move partnership was essential to the development of diverse strategies in a variety of settings, and at developing resources to allow physical activity and nutrition programming to continue.


Part B: An Assessment of Barnes County On The Move Grade 5 Program: Assessing Efficacy and Replicability of a Rural Community School Wellness Education Program.
Jennifer Uhrich, MPA, Executive Director, Well Being Development
Sharon Buhr, MPH, Director, Young People’s Healthy Heart Program, Mercy Hospital

ABSTRACT: Barnes County On The Move, a community public health network located in North Dakota, provides an annual 7-week school nutrition and physical activity intervention course for 5th graders at county schools. Available survey data from participants was analyzed to assess whether On The Move has reached its goals. This presentation places On The Move’s Grade 5 Program in the context of other school wellness programs.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Intensive 2: (continued)

Impact of the Oil Boom on Health Services: Looking to Solutions
Dan Kelly, CEO, McKenzie County Health System
Jeffrey Sather, MD, Medical Director, Emergency Trauma Center, Trinity Health
Sherry Adams, BA, REHS/RS, CHS-V, CDP-I, Executive Officer/Registered Environmental Health Specialist

ABSTRACT: The oil boom in western North Dakota has had a huge impact on healthcare services and services in general in the area. The first part of this intensive will focus on what is currently being felt by the impacted communities. The second part will include panelists discussing possible and already successful solutions for dealing with the effects that the oil boom has had on the communities.


Session 10: Poster Presentations

Rural Training for Rural Family Doctors
Kimberly Krohn, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Program Director, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Minot
Jeffrey Hostetter, MD, Program Director, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Bismarck
Rashida Mengi, MD, PGY1, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Minot
Priya Sahai, MBBS, PGY1, University of North Dakota Center for Family Medicine Minot

ABSTRACT: The development and design of two rural track family medicine programs are described. The evidence supporting rural track training is evaluated.

  • No Handout

Pharmacy in Rural North Dakota
Tara Morris, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University
Adam Muehler, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Rural North Dakota is facing a healthcare accessibility problem as these areas are medically underserved. We examined the way in which a pharmacist can help the public health sector of rural North Dakota through the services they provide. This presentation will be highlighting the About The Patient program and its effect on disease state outcomes. This presentation also explores telepharmacy.

  • No Handout

Telepharmacy: Increasing Healthcare Access
Nicole Teig, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University
Mikayla Fick, BS, PharmD Candidate, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this poster is to illustrate how telepharmacy services can be utilized to increase access to care in medically underserved areas. Telepharmacy is a validated methodology that utilizes technology to allow for the provision of pharmacy services such as dispensing, consultation, and disease state management, to areas that otherwise would not have access to these services. There are numerous public health implications associated with the utilization of telepharmacy. Telepharmacy offers a promising way to increase access to those residing in underserved areas, while additionally decreasing healthcare costs.

  • No Handout

Addressing Health Disparities: Standing Rock Men’s and Women’s Health Screening Days
Joyce Sayler, RN, Community Partnership Coordinator, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, North Dakota Department of Health
Margaret Gates, MMGT, BSW, AAS, Director, Standing Rock Tribal Health
Jodie Fetsch, RN, Director of Nursing, Custer Health

ABSTRACT: The presentation describes results of the Standing Rock Health Screening Days Enhanced Evaluation Project, which identified individual, family, community and characteristics of screening that support or are barriers to men’s and women’s participation in health screenings. Recommendations for increasing rates of health screening among tribal members concludes the presentation.

  • No Handout

Session 11: Impact of Emergency Evacuations on Skilled Nursing Facilities Residents' Health During 2009 Floods in Fargo, North Dakota
Tracy Miller, PhD, MPH, State Epidemiologist, North Dakota Department of Health

ABSTRACT: In North Dakota, emergency evacuations of skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have occurred 3 times since 1996. This study looked at the impact the 2009 flood evacuations had on Fargo SNF residents, investigated the possible declines in cognitive status, mood, and physical function as a result of these evacuations, and used data gathered from the Minimum Data Set 2.0 from all five Fargo SNFs evacuated during the 2009 flood, and controls from Bismarck, Grand Forks, and Minot, North Dakota. These findings could provide situational awareness to emergency planners, local public health agencies, and SNF leadership by highlighting the impact emergency evacuations have on residents. Additionally, it supports the need for preparation, planning and practice drills for when the next evacuation occurs.


Session 12: To Data and Beyond! An Overview of North Dakota Health Data
Judy Beck, MA, Quality Improvement Program Director, Quality Health Associates of North Dakota

ABSTRACT: In this presentation, Judy Beck of Quality Health Associates of North Dakota will provide data on the health of North Dakota. This will include an overview of chronic disease (diabetes and cardiovascular), healthcare disparities relating to American Indian populations, acute care utilization, and electronic health record utilization. Attendees will learn about current strategies and interventions being used to improve population health in North Dakota.


12:00 – 1:00 PM

Hot Topics Lunch


1:00 – 2:00 PM

Keynote 3: RX: Prescription for Success
Reneé Rongen, BA, President, Reneé Rongen & Associates, LLC

ABSTRACT: Is your organization aching for pain management? Let's get the stethoscope out and get to the heart of the matter. Are patients happy with the care they experience or are they calling 911 from their hospital beds? Is your organization's blood pressure rising with the changes in the healthcare industry? Do your patients experience more trauma when you, as healthcare professionals, are pushed to your limits as an industry? Prescription for Success outlines strategies for taking your organization's internal temperature. Laugh and learn the prescribed steps and re-focus on what the healthcare business is really about, your patients.

  • No Handout

2:30 – 3:30 PM

Intensive 3A: Health Information Technology in Practice Privacy & Security: HIPAA/HITECH/Meaningful Use - Looking Back, Forging Ahead
Patti Kritzberger, RHIT, CHPS, CPHP, Reach Coordinator – HIT/Quality Specialist, Quality Health Associates of North Dakota

ABSTRACT: This presentation will provide an overview of the HIPAA Privacy & Security regulations and will focus on the importance of this as it relates to meaningful use, the use of electronic health records and interoperability, as well as the HITECH Act.


Session 13: North Dakota Breastfeeding-Friendly Initiative Aims to Increase Duration and Exclusivity
BriAnna Wanner, BS, Nutrition and Breastfeeding Specialist, North Dakota Department of Health
Desiree Tande, PhD, Assistant Professor and Breastfeeding Consultant, University of North Dakota

ABSTRACT: Breast milk protects infants from common childhood infections and has been associated with protection against leading chronic diseases in adults. A new North Dakota Breastfeeding-Friendly designation program is addressing the need to integrate public health and primary care with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Increased breastfeeding can positively impact health.


Session 14: Community Wellness at a Tribal College
Pat Aune, MS, Wellness Circle Facilitator, Land Grant Programs Director, United Tribes Technical College
Jan Keller, MS, Extension Nutrition Educator, Land Grant Extension, United Tribes Technical College

ABSTRACT: Promoting wellness at United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) has been the focus of the Wellness Circle since 2002 when college president David Gipp signed the health and wellness initiative urging all employees, students, and families to participate individually and collectively in the UTTC Health and Wellness activities to support healthy lifestyles. This non-formal coalition, representing many departments and individuals, has led to the development of tobacco-free honoring policy, a policy supporting breastfeeding in the workplace, and 30 minutes per day devoted to physical activity. Multiple activities devoted to health and wellness are coordinated and promoted through the Wellness Circle.


Session 15:

Part A: Individual, Family, and Community Factors that Influence Health Outcomes in a Tribal Community
Jennifer Boeckel, PhD, Research Evaluation Specialist, Essentia Institute of Rural Health
Lane Azure, PhD, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Cankdeska Cikana Community College

ABSTRACT: This presentation will describe factors that influence general health in a rural, tribal community. This mixed method study, based on the 2012 BRFSS, collected information regarding individual, family and community factors. One-hundred and twenty-four students and faculty/staff completed the survey.

Part B: Cooking Camps Promote Food Safety and Nutrition Knowledge in Native American Youth
Kelly Burdett, BS, Graduate Assistant, North Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Native American youth attending a 4-day cooking camp reported gaining valuable life skills, improved fruit and vegetable intake, and greater knowledge of food safety and sustainability. Kids' cooking camps show promise for reducing obesity and improving overall nutrition in Native American youth.


3:35 – 4:35 PM

Intensive 3B: Health Information Technology in Practice North Dakota Health Information Network
Sheldon Wolf, CPA, North Dakota Health Information Network Director, North Dakota Information Technology Department

ABSTRACT: This presentation will provide attendees with an update on the North Dakota Health Information Network.


Session 16: Successful Rural Hospitals in Today’s Changing Healthcare Environment
Kelly Arduino, MBA, Partner, Wipfli LLP

ABSTRACT: What are the characteristics of successful CAHs and how do they manage their business? In this session we will use a case study to demonstrate some dashboard options to illustrate the key drivers of profitability for successful rural hospitals. We will also illustrate how to assess potential vulnerabilities and how to translate analysis into strategic priorities to position your organization for the future.

  • No Handout

Session 17: Status of Stroke/Cardiac Systems of Care in North Dakota
Shila Thorson, BSN, RN-BC, State Stroke/Cardiac System of Care Coordinator, North Dakota Department of Health
Jody Ward, RN, MS, APHN, Senior Project Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: This presentation will be an update on the Stroke and Cardiac Systems of Care. Discussion will include the Acute Stroke Ready Hospital Designation process and requirements.


Session 18: South Dakota, a Picture of Health: Rural Mental Health Study Results
Heidi Schultz, MBA, Program Officer, The Helmsley Charitable Trust

ABSTRACT:In the fall of 2013, The Helmsley Charitable Trust Rural Healthcare Program conducted a population-wide health needs assessment with emphasis on mental health in South Dakota. The goal was to ascertain rural data to build a baseline and to help prioritize needs and design grant programming. Learn about the survey design, conduction, results, and how it will shape mental health funding for The Trust.


Thursday, June 4, 2015

8:00 – 8:45 AM

Panel: Healthcare Policy: 64th Legislative Session Outcomes
Representative Jon Nelson, ND District 14
Senator Joan Heckman, MS, ND District 23

ABSTRACT: Two North Dakota legislators will discuss the 2015 legislative session and the outcomes related to healthcare.

  • No Handout

8:45 – 9:45 AM

Keynote 4: American Indian Health Equity: Past, Present and Future
Donald Warne, MD, MPH, Director, Master of Public Health Program, Associate Professor and Mary J Berg Distinguished Professorship in Women's Health, North Dakota State University Masters in Public Health Program

ABSTRACT: American Indians suffer from among the worst health disparities in the world, and American Indians in the Great Plains Region suffer to a greater degree than other American Indian population. Dr. Warne will present an overview of American Indian health disparities, as well as the historical policy decisions that have contributed to these significant conditions in Indian Country. Dr. Warne will also review and discuss the impact recent national and state legislation will have on impacting health disparities. Additionally, Dr. Warne will describe the role the American Indian Public Health Resource Center at North Dakota State University’s Public Health Program will play in helping Tribal Nations achieve health equity in the future.


10:00 – 11:00 AM

Intensive 4: Update on Tobacco Control Laws and Opportunities: E-cigarettes, Housing, and Taxes
Mark Meaney, JD, Staff Attorney, Tobacco Control Legal Consortium

ABSTRACT: This presentation will highlight recent changes in e-cigarette policies at the federal, state, and local levels. It will also identify state and local options for regulating e-cigarettes in light of such changes. In addition, this session will review laws related to the implementation of smoke-free multi-unit housing policies, economic and health benefits of such policies and any changes in federal rules from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development related to the adoption and implementation of such policies. Finally, this session will look at changes in tobacco taxes in North Dakota and throughout the country, and discuss the correlation between tobacco price and use, especially among children.


Session 19: Creative Solutions to Challenging Access Issues – A “New Generation” of Telehealth Services
Mary DeVany, BS, Director, Great Plains Telehealth Resource and Assistance Center, University of Minnesota
Susan Berry, MBA, Enterprise Director of Telehealth Services, Sanford Health

ABSTRACT: Improving the ability to access healthcare services in a timely manner continues to be a challenge in North Dakota. While telehealth has had an impact, some patients are not accessing the services they need at a traditional healthcare location. This panel will share a variety of services and experiences as the "traditional telehealth box" is again stretched to consider new DTC care options.


Session 20: Understanding Human Trafficking in North Dakota
Patrick Atkinson, MA, Founder/Executive Director, The Institution for Trafficked, Exploited and Missing Persons

ABSTRACT: This presentation will discuss human trafficking on both an international and local scale. You will leave with both an understanding of this issue and ways you can protect yourself and those around you. You will also learn what you can do to help raise awareness and teach others about how this issue is affecting your community.


11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Intensive 4: Update on Tobacco Control Laws and Opportunities: E-cigarettes, Housing, and Taxes (continued)
Mark Meaney, JD, Staff Attorney, Tobacco Control Legal Consortium Control


Session 21: Positioning Yourself to Partner with Other Healthcare Providers
Kelly Arduino, MBA, Partner, Wipfli LLP

ABSTRACT: Partnerships are essential for future viability of your healthcare organization and there is more to being a partner than just saying you are connected. This session will discuss how to prepare yourself and other organizations for not only being a great partner but getting what you need from the relationship whether.

  • No Handout

Session 22: Challenges in Evaluating Rural Health Programs
Jirina Foltysova, DrPH, Evaluation Faculty, Center for Rural Health, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

ABSTRACT: The presenter will share experiences with the evaluation of the Area Health Education Center. The challenges in evaluating this program in rural settings will be described first. Then the consequences of failing to address these issues will be outlined. Finally, the utility of Theory Driven Evaluation strategies will be discussed.

  • No Handout