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Emergency Medical Services

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in North Dakota face significant challenges. Over 90 percent of EMS staff are volunteer, with continually dwindling numbers. Many ambulance services and quick response units do not have reliable and sustainable funding sources. To support North Dakota EMS, the Center for Rural Health:

  • Conducts research on rural emergency infrastructure.
  • Facilitates and encourages the ongoing collaboration between emergency medical services and critical access hospitals throughout North Dakota.
  • Partners with the North Dakota EMS Association to provide quality improvement initiatives for EMS units.
  • Works with ND Department of Health, Division of EMS and Trauma and other stakeholders to determine how a community paramedicine model might work in North Dakota.
  • Support efforts to assist critical access hospitals and rural communities in developing collaborative regional or local systems of care, addressing community needs and integrating EMS.

For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services page on the Center for Rural Health's Rural Health Information Hub website.

Key Contact

Lynette Dickson, MS, RD, LRD - Associate Director

Most Recent Publications

  • Defining Systems to Evaluate System Efficiency and Effectiveness
    Article focuses on the application of systems thinking, systems theory and systems evaluation theory (SET) in evaluating of modern day systems efficiency and effectiveness.
    Author(s): Renger, R., Foltysova, J., Renger, J., Booze, W.
    Publication: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, 17(3), 4-13
    Date: August 2017
    Type: Journal Article
  • Rural and Urban Utilization of the Emergency Department for Mental Health and Substance Abuse
    Utilizes data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s (HCUP’s) State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) for seven states. Researchers explore, and describe in this brief, the use of the Emergency Department for mental health and substance abuse among Urban, Large Rural, Small Rural, and Isolated Small Rural residents.
    Author(s): Schroeder, S., Peterson, M.
    Date: June 2017
    Type: Policy Brief

Most Recent Presentations

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